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Which RV will you choose for full-timing?

Posted by Agnes on February 11, 1999:
         We haven't yet decided on the RV we will choose. Regarding size, my husband
         would like to get a 36' with a slide out. I would prefer to go no larger than 34'
         and don't mind if it doesn't have a slide out. Rich is over six feet tall and feels
         confined in real small spaces so that's why the difference. We plan to full time
         so would appreciate any thoughts from others regarding a good size and type. 

Posted by Rik Roberts on March 08, 1999:
        In Reply to: Choosing an RV posted by Agnes on February 11, 1999
         We have a 1998 36S Bounder slide and I am 6' 3". Would never, ever
         consider having anything but a slide. Absolutely no problems after living in it for
         18 months...both in the snow and the desert heat. Rik 

Posted by Linda on February 18, 1999:
        In Reply to: Choosing an RV posted by Agnes on February 11, 1999
         When selecing our fifth-wheel, I made my 6'2' hubby stretch out on the bed,
         stand in the shower and checked for headroom...we did this in every model we
         looked at. To our surprize, we encountered all kinds of variables! (I figured if
         we were going to LIVE in our RV, the BIG GUY needed to have a
         comfortable space.) We chose a Kit Classic Sky-Lounge, with the living room
         up front, over the hitch. We love it, and have happily been fulltimers since
         1988. Linda Handie

Posted by Agnes on February 18, 1999 at 16:28:39:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Linda on February 18, 1999
         Wow, fulltiming since 1988! I'm so envious! Rich is trying out the beds and
         showers in every MH we look at. We know that 5Ws offer a lot more space
         for the size but have decided that a MH is right for us. Now if we could just
         decide on which one and how much we want to pay for it! We set a limit and
         then see something wonderful and then start thinking, "Should we...." Last
         weekend we saw a beautiful 1993 33' Beaver and, of course, it's over our
         "limit" but..... We also saw a nice 1994 Vectra that is within our limits but I'm a
         little concerned about the lack of counter space in it. I intend to cook nearly
         every day so want to have space in which to do it. Decisions, decisions. Sure
         appreciate any advise or suggestions. Thanks! Agnes  
 

Posted by george on February 21, 1999 at 08:36:13:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Agnes on February 18, 1999
         Agnes, As for cooking, even fulltimers do most all outside on a grill or over a
         pit in many cases. Baking and such occurs inside and so too some defrosting in
         the microwave. There are many things to consider in a fulltiming RV, and much
         of it is personal. If you need lots of countertop space, I suppose that's
         important. But don't let it get in the way of living. Besides life is more that home
         cooking. happy motoring, George 
 

Posted by Barb Hofmeister on March 14, 1999 at 18:29:46:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by george on February 21, 1999
         I do most of my cooking inside and have in all of our motorhomes. Neither the
         Mallard or our Bounder had much counter space but we managed and I
         cooked elaborate as well as simple meals. I still say, "where there is a will there
         will be a way." Barb

Posted by Agnes on February 23, 1999 at 10:01:38:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by george on February 21, 1999
         Thanks, George! Don't worry, nothing will get in our way--we plan to start this
         new adventure as soon as we can. We know that we will have to compromise
         on some things and are prepared to do so. Guess I'll have to learn a new way
         of cooking! We have noticed that people even take their electric skillets out on
         the picnic table. We can hardly wait to begin learning all this new stuff! Agnes 

Posted by Sherry on April 10, 1999 at 17:51:18:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Agnes on February 23, 1999
         Adequate counterspace is perhaps THE top priority I have when selecting the
         ultimate RIGHT RV for full-timing. We are still in the shopping stage, with 18
         months before we hit the road. We both love cooking, and would never
         compromise on the kitchen arrangement. The kitchen is always the first thing
         we check out, and if it isn't sufficient, there is no point in looking at the rest of
         the RV! Yes, we cook out a lot, but when full-timing, you can't expect to cook
         out every meal every day! Remember, this will be your permanent way of life,
         not just a camping trip! 
 

Posted by Vickie on March 05, 1999 at 14:32:09:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Agnes on February 23, 1999
         Hi fellow fulltimers. We too are starting this year fulltiming and I wondered
         what you do with a grill between setups---pack it inside the home or dismantle it
         for underneath storage or just put in the back of the truck? We will be getting a
         34-36'5th wheel trailer. Any comments on pros and cons of 5th wheels. What
         model is liked best etc. Thanks for all the help. 

Posted by RamblinReeces on April 05, 1999 at 14:45:17:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Vickie on March 05, 1999
         Dismantle grill? We carry a compact propane grill. Cook, cool down, close lid
         and store. Works great. Bonnie Reece 
 

Posted by Barb Hofmeister on March 14, 1999 at 18:32:08:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Vickie on March 05, 1999
         We just have a little portable grill that is no problem to store at all. We put it in
        one of the outside storage bays when we are not using it. Barb 
 

Posted by Pat Colwell on March 29, 1999 at 21:21:26:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Barb Hofmeister on March 14, 1999:
         To all of you with questions about which RV, size, safety, etc. let me
         recommend the RV Consumer Group at www.rv.org. I became a member and
         it has been the best one hundred dollars I've ever spent even though I have not
         as yet purchased an RV. Although not associated with Consumer Reports
         magazine, the Consumer Group deals with RVs in much the same manner,
         testing, rating, advising of models to steer clear of and much more. Check them
         out; you'll be glad you did. 
 

Posted by Chris on May 12, 1999 at 19:10:16:
        In Reply to: Re: Choosing an RV posted by Pat Colwell on March 29, 1999:
              Yes, the Court of Public Opinion on rv.org is a real eye-opener!! 
 

Posted by Bev Austin on February 13, 1999 at 13:52:39:
          Well, we're looking for an RV now, too. I don't believe there is only
         one right size. We are wanting the 34 with bumpouts, but I'd like to have room
         to later add a washer/dryer setup. Don't think we will go that big, because of
         the price. Price seems to be the final determining factor for us, along with
         manufacturer support of the vehicles. This can be very critical, when you read
         of some of the problems people have, and the lack of concern on the part of
         many manufacturers, after the vehicle is out of their hands. 

Posted by Dick on March 07, 1999 at 18:00:59:
        In Reply to: RV Right Size posted by Bev Austin on February 13, 1999:
         I am also going through the question of new vs used. I would probably buy the
         same model and size either way (will be about 3 years from now), but wonder
         if the warantees, etc. on the new unit and the comfort zone that would create
         might not be worth the expense. Then again, if we buy used, there may be a
         few areas where we won't get exactly what we want, but we would have extra
         money to spend to personalize the rig while spending about the same money
         total as for a new one! Another thing that may be a problem for us is that we
         don't want the extended width nor a slide out (looking at 33-34' motor homes).
         The way the manufacturers seem to be headed, we may not have much choice
         in new units that don't have either over 96" width or a slide. That could limit us
         only to used rigs. It is fun looking and we are enjoying camping and talking with
         others in our current 24' class C rig. That is a good way to learn! Dick in
         Auburn, WA 
 

Posted by Agnes on February 17, 1999 at 11:43:56:
        In Reply to: RV Right Size posted by Bev Austin on February 13, 1999
         Bev, I agree with what you said about price! We go back and forth between
         getting a used MH or setting our sights a little lower and buying a smaller new
         unit. We are trying to be very careful to be sure that we are able to carry the
         weight of the "things" we'll want to take with us. Some of the units we look at
         have very limited payload capacity. We never realized the search would be so
         hard! But, we're actually enjoying it so we'll keep on until we find the right unit
         for us. Agnes 

Posted by Mario on April 13, 1999 at 15:49:23:
         If you plan to boondock(dry camp) for any extended period, be sure your RV
         can handle the addition of batteries. Most RV's under 32 ft. ship with just one
         Group 24 battery which will not handle extended boondocking. You must
         determine where the additional batteries will be located. Don't accept promises
         or verbalization that "it's no problem". Most deep cycle batteries measure
         approximately 13" wide, 7" deep, 10" high, with the 6V batteries even higher.
         Take a ruler and measure. If an 1000 watt or higher inverter is in your plans,
         remember that the inverter must be mounted within 10 feet of the batteries but
         not in the same compartment. Look before you leap. 

Posted by Katy on March 13, 1999 at 20:09:51:
         We're narrowing our choices down and trying to decide between two Komfort
         fifth wheels. One is 30 feet and the other 33. Both have a LR/DR and bedroom
         bumpout. The difference is the 33 foot one has the rear bay windows with
         recliners. We had thougth we'd keep our maximum length to 30 feet, as we
         want to camp in national forests, etc., but now we're not sure. The weight is
         almost the same for both. Will three more feet make that much difference?
         What would those of you with experience say? Thanks for your help. 

Posted by Randolph Davis on March 15, 1999 at 19:10:28:
        In Reply to: RV Length posted by Katy on March 13, 1999 at 20:09:51:
         Katy, I have heard several people complain about all the windows at the rear
         of the fiver getting very dirty and dusty. It's probably much like the windows on
         station wagons and vans. The dust from the wheels roll out the back and end
         up on the windows. I suppose it's okay, if you want to wash them regularly.
         
 

Posted by ebs on March 15, 1999 at 19:29:42:
        In Reply to: Re: RV Length posted by Randolph Davis on March 15, 1999
          I've ordered a 32ft Fiver with the BIG rear window. I want to see something
          besides the RV next to me when I'm in a campground. It shouldn't take more
          that a minute to spray the window off with the hose. 
 

Posted by Randolph Davis on March 16, 1999 at 21:10:01:
        In Reply to: Re: RV Length posted by ebs on March 15, 1999 at 19:29:42:
         EBS, That's true! I just don't do windows in my anchored home. I prefer to
         move instead. So I don't think I would find myself doing the windows each time
         I pulled into the campground. They have a great view, though, and one of my
         favorite 5ers has a big rear window.

Posted by Karin Proctor on March 27, 1999 at 14:52:59:
        In Reply to: Re: RV Length posted by Randolph Davis on March 16, 1999
         We also were worried about length of 5th wheel that could be accomidated in
         the west and National Camp grounds. The model we have been looking at also
         has a big window in the rear. Our main concern was added heat in the summer,
         and loss of heat in the winter. I have asked motorhome users about the
         windshield in the motorhomes but have had various answers. They tend to
         cover thiers all the time. If that is the case then we figure why have a huge
         window we can't use. We figure not to buy anything bigger than 31ft. Is that to
         big to get in places?

Posted by Ebs on March 27, 1999 at 23:15:15:
        In Reply to: Re: RV Length posted by Karin Proctor on March 27, 1999
         We have a fiver with the big rear window on order. Because, I want to see
         something other than another RV when I'm parked in a campground. I plan to
         have the one way window covering installed on these windows. I don't know
         what it's called, it's a plastic sheet that is applied to the glass. I've seen it on rear
         windows of pickup trucks and we now have the "smoke" type on the car we
         have. Your dealer can probably tell you where to get this done and it will keep
         the heat from the sun out. 
 

Posted by Karin Proctor on March 28, 1999 at 20:41:52:
        In Reply to: Re: RV Length posted by Ebs on March 27, 1999 at 23:15:15:
           I had looked into that but was told it would not insulate the interior. So we
           would lose some heat in the cool months and air in the hot months.

Posted by Bob Griffin on March 09, 1999 at 12:06:52:
         I too am curious what everyone's experience has been regarding campground
         length restrictions? Ron and Barb started out with a "small" 24, then went to a
         34 then a 39. In their book there is a reference to length being more of a
         problem now, but nothing specific. We are "debating" between a 36' and a 38'
         because of the difference with inside storage. Seems as though the problem is
         more in the state and national campgrounds. I thought the limit was 35 in most,
         not 36 as someone posted? Does anyone have web pages that lists the length
         restrictions for national parks? I have looked at the national park pages and its
         not obvious. I found one reference to the 35' length limit, but didnt mark the
         page and have not been able to find it again. Thanks in advance... Bob...
         

Posted by Bill Firestone on March 21, 1999 at 21:08:18:
        In Reply to: Campground Length Restrictions posted by Bob Griffin on March 09, 1999
         Bob, Ever since you made this posting I have been thinking that someone
         would reply to it, but since no one has I will take a shot at it. My experience is
         older than probably a lot of other peoples (16 years in Alaska where things are
         very different), but may still be valid. I am quite sure that there is no uniform
         size restriction in any campground that is managed by a government agency,
         (National Park Service, BLM, Corps of Engineers, state, county or city
         government. Size seems to be more a function of when the individual park was
         built. The older the park the smaller the campsite. Older parks my have a limit
         of anywhere from 20ft. to around 35 ft. More recently built parks may be able
         to handle 36ft. to 40+ft. A personal experience, in 1974 I then had what was
         considered the largest motorhome on the market a 28 ft'er. I wanted to stay in
         a state campground in Big Sur, CA, which I knew had a limit of 25 ft. When I
         was registering for a campsite I was asked how long I was and replied without
         blinking 25 ft. They looked skeptical but gave me a site anyway. Which I was
         able to get into, but it was tight. On the way to my site I saw several sites that
         had long approaches from the camp road that would accommodate a rig much
         longer than mine. So the next day when I decided to stay for a couple more
         days I got the number of a large site and reregistered and requested the bigger
         site and had a great time with lots of room. Sometimes sizes are set to reflect
         the smallest site so that workers don't have to guess if your rig will fit or not. So
         within reason a rig can shrink a bit if it need to. If you think you will be visiting
         the older more secluded National Parks I would stay with the 35 or 36 ft. size.
         One other answer is to camp at the closest comercial park and take the toad
         into the park each day. I hope this helps. Bill 

Posted by Dick Feit on April 05, 1999 at 12:52:40:
         It seems to me that the general trend these days is for manufacturers to build
         more and more wide body models. I see in TL's Campground Directory that
         some states like AZ limit you to 8ft max. I would have thought that with the
         popularity of AZ in the winter that many wide body RV's must go there. Is the
         8ft limitation enforced or not? What experience has anyone along these lines
         

Posted by george on April 06, 1999 at 06:35:32:
        In Reply to: RV Width posted by Dick Feit on April 05, 1999 at 12:52:40:
         Dick in an artical at www.escapees.com they disect this subject. AZ and other
         states do have such laws but are not generally enforced. Please check out the
         site. Its also a referenced site here I believe. Happy motoring george
         

Posted by R Bellaw on April 08, 1999 at 22:12:04:
        In Reply to: Re: RV Width posted by george on April 06, 1999
          I attempted to find Escapees Web site info. on RV width laws and
          enforcement, but could not locate the article you mentioned. Please provide
          additional info. as I getting close to a wide body motorhome purchase and
          don't want to be unduly restricted in where i go. Thanks. 

Posted by Mario on February 23, 1999 at 14:15:11:
         We are going to buy a Class C 27-31 Ft Motorhome in the next 3 months and
         begin fulltiming. A slideout has never been considered because we felt that it
         was relatively a new technology, prone to more mechanical problems, and
         collected debris, pests, birds, and related droppings. There are reports of
         leaks, drafts, jams, and odors etc. We wanted fulltiming to be as free from
         mechanical problems as possible. Now, in looking at Net Carrying Capacity on
         the stickers, we were appalled at the weight that these slideouts added and as a
         result have seen a NCC as low as 911 lbs on some units. That means that with
         full freshwater and fuel, the rig would be overloaded as soon as my wife and I
         get aboard. Will some of you fulltimers with slideouts share your experiences?
         Thanks Mario 

Posted by Gary Kirberg on May 13, 1999 at 18:41:01:
        In Reply to: Slideout comments posted by Mario on February 23, 1999
         My wife and I are looking for a fulltiming unit and both agree the living
         room/dining slide is a must. I will sacrifice the lost storage for the added room
         and feeling of space. I would, however, resist the urge for the double or triple
         slide units as that amount of weight is extreme. I have posted on this and other
         forums inquiring about slide failures/problems and have heard few major
         problems.

Posted by Dick Davis on March 23, 1999 at 16:27:24:
        In Reply to: Slideout comments posted by Mario on February 23, 1999
         We are not full-timers, but we have a 1998 Allegro that we bought Dec. 29,
         1997. Ours is a 33 ft. unit and has the couch/dinette slide. I can tell you! We'll
         NEVER own another motor home without one. The livability and room is
         worth a sacrifice in weight. With a full tank of water and gasoline and most of
         our 'stuff' the unit weighs in at 16,250 lbs. where its GVWR is 16,500. True we
         are close to the limit, but we love the slide. We've never had any of those
         problems I've heard about, some that you mention. True, it is 'more mechanics'.
         But weren't your leveling jacks a few years ago?? Each system must be
         maintained. But I'll gladly do that. The slide changes the MH to comfortable
         place where we can stay indefinitely. 

Posted by Bob Griffin on March 09, 1999 at 12:46:55:
        In Reply to: Slideout comments posted by Mario on February 23, 1999
         I do not have a slideout, in fact I currently don't have an RV, it's been 10 years
         since we had one, a 27'. We are now in the market for a unit for fulltiming.
         Initially, we thought the slideouts were great, but then as we looked closer, we
         have become less enamored and for most of the reasons Barb listed. You lose
         storage space and it is a complicated system. There are manual overrides in
         case the system fails, but I have read that sometimes these fail and don't allow
         you to close the slideout. Also, these take a fair amount of strength to operate
         manual overrides and are usually accessed by crawling underneath the coach. It
         is interesting that the high line coach manufacturers resisted adding slideouts,
         but the market expectations had to be met and they started building these. Their
         slideouts tend to be heavier than the average motorhome slideout. Compare
         weight of the unit with and without a slide to see how the unit you are
         considering stacks up.For a galley slide, ask the salesman to show you the
         access area to the plumbing lines. Great engineering "trick", it is very clever, but
         eventually wear will cause a leak. When the slide is out the RV "insulation"
         factors drop. Just look at how thin the wall extensions and the slideout's roof
         are. The other important thing to look for is how they "lock" the slideout back
         into the coach. Some have built in mechanisms, others have manual locks the
         owner is required to lock into place before driving. But, all the owners I have
         talked to love their slides and can't imagine not having one. So far few
         problems. But these things are not that old. just my 2 cents....Bob 
 

Posted by Barbara Hofmeister on February 24, 1999 at 23:18:24:
        In Reply to: Slideout comments posted by Mario on February 23, 1999
         We don't have a slide out but I wanted to respond and say that we did not
         choose a slide out for two reasons (and we have a diesel with a lot of carrying
         capacty). Reason number one is that slide outs cut down on the amount of
         storage space available both under the slide and in the cupboards in the slide (if
         there are in fact cupboards there). Number two reason is that they are one
         more mechanical thing that can fail. Perhaps because we started out with a 24
         foot Class C (without a slide) and did fine wor over three years, we felt that our
         34 foot (non slide out) was huge. I will add that those that have slides love the
         extra space they get. But if you are going to end up being overweight, I would
         think twice. Barb

Posted by Sandi on April 03, 1999 at 13:11:58:
         Hi there! My other half and I are having a difference of opinion and are hoping
         that you (everyone) can help us to resolve it. We are planning on fulltimming
         within the next 1-2 years. We've been doing our research and have looked at
         hundreds of RV's. Our problem? I prefer a class C and he prefers class A.
         Since we will be fulltiming he's concerned about being cooped up. I'm more
         concerned with handling and driving a class A. And wouldn't maintenance on a
         class C be less expensive than a class A? I have no experience with driving
         even a van and we want to share driving responsibilities. I have always
         preferred small cars-didn't even like driving my parents station wagon (too big).
         I think that a class C will be easier to handle and if it's a 30' wouldn't that give
         us more opportunities to park in the national campgrounds that have size
         restrictions? He says a class A will give us more living space and I can handle
         the bigger rig with some practice. Please help! We're youngsters (early 40's)
         and are looking forward to retiring early. We are planning on workamping to
         earn our keep, as well as finding out what types and kinds of services other
         fulltimers are in need of-but that's for another posting. Looking forward to
         hearing from everyone.
 

Posted by Chris on May 12, 1999 at 19:41:03:
        In Reply to: Difference of opinion posted by Sandi on April 03, 1999
         Sandi, if your biggest concern is being able to handle the rig, don't worry about
         it. I'm a bus driver, and I can tell you that there is not much difference between
         handling the two. There are tricks to the driving, and once you learn those you'll
         be fine. See if you can find a bus or truck driver to give you lessons, or
         consider taking a school bus driving course. After a few weeks of practice
         you'll be wondering why you ever worried! 
 

Posted by Elliott on April 19, 1999 at 12:36:24:
        In Reply to: Difference of opinion posted by Sandi on April 03, 1999
         Sandi, Yep you have to get the big rig. Think about it, the rig is parked alot
         more that it is on the road especially if you are fulltiming. If you get a quality big
         rig it would actually be easier and more stable to drive than a class C. Good
         luck and happy motering.
 

Posted by Mario on April 05, 1999 at 10:14:54:
        In Reply to: Difference of opinion posted by Sandi on April 03, 1999
         We will be fulltiming in 9/99 and we have a 31 Ft. Class C for several reasons.
         First and foremost,we have young grandchilden and more on the way, who will
         be with us occasionally. Young kids just love the overhead bunk and it
         provides a sleeping area (also play area) for them while we still have a private
         bedroom. This means that the sofa doesn't have to be opened and the dinette
         does have to be set up as a bed. Secondly, the vehicle part of the Motorhome
         is a Ford Truck that is serviceable at any Ford Dealer. We see only one real
         advantage of a Class A and that's the picture window view out front. If you will
         never have overnight guests, then a Class A should be your choice. Mario
        
 

Posted by ebs on April 03, 1999 at 20:31:48:
        In Reply to: Difference of opinion posted by Sandi on April 03, 1999
         Go for the class A and visit Dick Reed at www.rvschool.com youll be happier
         in the bigger rig in the long run. 
 

Posted by Tom Strauss on February 28, 1999 at 15:50:29:
         We currently have a 34' Southwind and are a little over two years from
         full-timing. We are thinking of moving up to a 40' pusher (somewhat like Ron &
         Barb did in going from the Bounder to the Dream). I would like to get some
         comments from people who currently own a coach in the 39 - 40' range.
         Would you get this size again? Why or why not? While some parks /
         campgrounds have restrictions on longer lengths, has a 40' coach, in reality,
         restricted your plans (do you find alternate sites and use a toad when faced
         with length restrictions ...)? Does this length cause extra problems when doing
         "2 lane road" excursions? Yes, there will be some fuel economy penalty with a
         40' vs a shorter, lighter coach ... but are there other drawbacks that should be
         considered? If there are, how are you addressing them? Thanks. Tom & Fran
         

Posted by GEORGE on March 12, 1999 at 23:58:18:
        In Reply to: Problems with a 40 posted by Tom Strauss on February 28, 1999
         I am new to the group. I am looking for a RV. I would like to know which ones
         to stay away from and which ones are the good ones. Money is not a real
         issue.I am thinking in the 35 to 40 ft range. Although i would probaly like to
         buy a new used one. Please send me a copy of your response to muy e-mail
         address Thanks George

Posted by george on April 06, 1999 at 06:43:00:
        In Reply to: WHAT RV SHOULD I BUY posted by GEORGE on March 12, 1999
          Try the site www.rv.org and also www.rvamerica.com Both will provide you
          some much needed information. happy motoring George. r
 

Posted by Gary on April 14, 1999 at 16:11:25:
         I have read numerous pros and cons of slideouts but my wife insists we have
         one. The roomier feeling is just too much for her to give up. My feeling is I
         would rather have a 28-30 foot 5th wheel with a living/dining slideout than a
         larger unit without a slideout. Towing, parking and maneuvering should be
         easier. Have other fulltimers out there made this tough decision also and what is
         your feeling now?

Posted by Dave Jenkins on May 04, 1999 at 18:29:34:
        In Reply to: Slideout Compromise posted by Gary on April 14, 1999
         A year after we moved in and we're still grinning. Two slides, one in
         living/dining room and one in bedroom. 33' 5th wheel, and it works great for
         us. Makes all the differnce in the world. Ordered new, some custom work for
         computer desk and book shelves, and except for some little nit picks, we wish
         we'd done it sooner. Big mistake was thinking we could haul it with a pickup.
         Going up is slow but just a nuisance. Going down is downright dangerous as is
         emergency stopping. Legal ramifications as well as safety considerations. Don't
         overload!! We decided to work another year to be able to buy medium duty
         truck which was ordered last week. We're counting the days! 

Posted by Dick on April 01, 1999 at 23:15:08:
           Anyone have any experience with the V10 in a Class A MH? Info such as
           mileage, pulling power, reliability, etc. would be greatly appreciated.
           

Posted by RamblinReece on April 05, 1999 at 14:03:39:
        In Reply to: Class A MHs with V10 Ford Engine posted by Dick on April 01, 1999
         We have a 36' Bounder with the Triton V10 engine. We love it. We get 8 mpg
         in the hills and 10mpg on the flat. We notice that the transmission gears down
         sooner in the hills than our last RV, but by doing that, it is doing its job and
         taking the stress off the engine. We have been on 18%grades and still had
         plenty of power. We researched the engine thoroughly before we bought it and
         didn't find anything negative. 

Posted by Ed Richmond on April 03, 1999 at 06:35:45:
        In Reply to: Class A MHs with V10 Ford Engine posted by Dick on April 01, 1999
         I have very little experience. I just got a 33' Sea Breeze on the V10. I haven't
         driven very many miles yet, but I kept track on a recent trip of a little over three
         hundred miles and I got 7 miles per gallon, but I had also run the generator for
         1/2 hour, so I don't know how to figure in that part. 

Posted by Roberta on March 14, 1999 at 10:09:42:
         Hi, Just found your website and have been setting here off and on for 3 days
         reading it. It's great. My question is "Do they make 5th Wheelers with twin
         beds?" Which company? We are going to buy one and live in it in preparation
         for full timing in 5 years. Keep up the good work. 

Posted by Helen on March 21, 1999 at 00:12:17:
        In Reply to: 5th wheels posted by Roberta on March 14, 1999
         Roberta, Newmar provides the option of having twin beds in their 5th wheels
         and they have a website with layouts. Their web address is: Newmar.com I
         believe. Maybe this can help you get started. 

Posted by Barb Hofmeister on March 14, 1999 at 18:19:55:
        In Reply to: 5th wheels posted by Roberta on March 14, 1999
          Yes, they do but most often it is an option so the unit must be ordered. Barb
          
 

Posted by Katy on March 15, 1999 at 20:02:33:
        In Reply to: Re: 5th wheels posted by Barb Hofmeister on March 14, 1999
         I've seen them listed as options in several brochures we've picked up at the RV
         dealers. Just start canvasing the dealers or go to an RV show and you should
         see plenty. In some of the dealers web sites they have floorplans as well. 
 

Posted by Terri on March 07, 1999 at 20:00:19:
         Hi. I'm researching for my first motorhome (probably Class A) purchase. I
         really like the room in a slide-out but would like to hear from people who have
         them. Any leaks, wind noises while traveling or problems? If you did it again,
         would you still buy it w/slide? Can you use the aisle with slide in, such at
         reststops,etc w/no problems? Any info is appreciated. Thanks! Terri in Mich
         
 

Posted by Ramblin Reece on April 05, 1999 at 14:31:53:
        In Reply to: slide-outs-pros and cons posted by Terri on March 07, 1999
         We recently bought a 36'Bounder with a street side slide that houses the dinette
         and couch. We found that the galley slides are not as large. We love it and
         wouldn't buy a RV without one. Our only regret is that we didn't wait another
         year and get a bedroom slide as well. The interior with the slide in is exactly like
         an RV without a slide. The sink, stove, bathroom and bedroom are completely
         usable. There is some loss in the outside storage but with 36', there is still
         plenty. When the slide is extended, the front area becomes a room. This is
         particularly nice when we have guests. There is no rattle or wind from the slide.
         It extends and retracts smoothly. We were advised by the dealer not to
         purchase auxiallary jacks. The slide is engineered to handle its own weight. We
         heartly endorse getting a model with slide-outs. Bonnie Reece
         
 

Posted by Katy on February 22, 1999 at 20:53:02:
         We're scouting RV's for fulltiming and are looking at two models. A Terry EX
         and a Komfort. Both have one large living room slide and a bedroom slide, and
         are in the 28-30 foot range. Has anyone had exceptionally good or bad luck
         with either of these brands. Any suggestion 

Posted by Ebs on February 20, 1999 at 08:44:04:
         Barb, I've ordered the book. Just came from a huge RV show in Salt Lake
         City today. Some nice stuff there. Only saw 2 makes that appear real quality
         built. (I'm a mechanical engineer). Travel Supreme is great. But, I like the layout
         bed/bath area and rear living area the best in the Keystone Montana. However,
         I've been searching the net and have read some HORROR stories about
         Keystone. Anyone out there had any experience or heard any GOOD stories
         about the Montana?

Posted by Chris on May 12, 1999 at 18:47:24:
          I am leaning toward a bus conversion rather than a manufactured Class A.
          Anyone here have experience with both types and a preference for one over
          the other? Mine would be an older bus, not one of those $500K jobs. 
 

Posted by Katy and Gary on May 02, 1999 at 20:55:45:
         We're full-time wannabe's looking for a fifth wheel. We're debating about
         upgrading from aluminum to fiberglass and wonder about the pros and cons for
         each. The fiberglass weighs more and is considerably more expensive. It is
         worth the extra weight and money? What about repairs and durability for each?
         We'd appreciate any feedback from those of you more experienced and what
         your thoughts are. Thanks, Katy and Gary 
 

Posted by Ebs on May 03, 1999 at 23:25:52:
        In Reply to: Aluminum vs Fiberglass posted by Katy and Gary on May 02, 1999
         Just got a 32ft CrossRoads Fiver fiberglass with gelcoat. Had the same
         questions you have. Decided that one good hail storm would be worth the
         difference. also, fiberglass is easier to repair and will probally look better in the
         long run. 
 

Posted by edward mabry on May 01, 1999 at 21:09:44:
         i am about to purchase my first motorhome. we will be using it mostly for
         touring and every so often we will be sleeping in it as well. i am seriously
         considering the seabreeze 31' on a ford chassis. i would greatly appreciate any
         comments about the seabreeze and suggestions of a dealer i the mid-atlantic
         area. we are in norfolk. many thanks. 
 

Posted by Mario on April 15, 1999 at 10:13:50:
          I'm planning to take factory delivery of a new motorhome. Has anyone "been
          there and done that". Appreciate any thoughts or experiences. Thanks 
 

Posted by Sally on April 13, 1999 at 23:59:08:
         I'm a single woman and I just ordered a new 32' Allegro with the Ford V10
         and without a slide. It should be big enough for me and my two small terriers. I
         plan on doing lots of boondocking. I have a little over two years before retire-
         ment but I'll move into the motorhome as soon as my house sells. I can't wait!
         
 

Posted by Larry on March 16, 1999 at 20:51:08:
         Am looking at retiring in five years and have been considering a Trailmanor
         (rigid wall swing up type camper) for a semi-full time type RV. Any one else
         out there have a Trailmanor who is using it in a similar manor. I like the
         manuverability of a small camper. Any suggestions, comments. Thanks, Larry
         
 

Posted by Bill Bailey on April 17, 1999 at 15:11:22:
        In Reply to: Trailmanor posted by Larry on March 16, 1999 at 20:51:08:
         We just retired and purchased a 33/26 Trailmanor 1999 and love it. They are
         easy to tow, hardly know they are there. I use a 98 Tahoe with no problems.
         They set up fast and break down just as easy. The Gas used per mile is about
         95% so it is not expensive to tow. We just had our grandchildren spend a
         week with us with no problems and lots of room. Lots of storage also.
         

Posted by Larry on April 18, 1999 at 21:22:17:
        In Reply to: Re: Trailmanor posted by Bill Bailey on April 17, 1999 at 15:11:22:
         Thank you very much for the input Bill. Your experience has encouraged me.      
 

 Posted by Jerry Kreger on April 18, 1999 at 03:47:14:
         Since the Vectra Grand tour is being discontinued because Winnebago can no
         longer get the P12 Chassis, we are looking at other coaches. The Bounder
         Turbo Diesel 39Z and Discovery 37V are in our price range. Neither has all of
         the standard ammenities of the Vectra and both seem to lack the superb
         craftsmanship but they both appear to be very good coaches. Both are
         powered by Cummins ISB turbocharged, aftercooled, 5.9L electronic diesels
         (275HP). Does anyone have any good or bad comments about these rigs.
         Your replys will be greatly appreciated. Our time is getting short and we'ld like
         to start full-timing in a new coach. We presently have a '93 Adventurer 34RQ
         and it's been a wonderful workhorse but we want more room and a little bit
         more luxury. Thanks for your help. Jerry 
 

Posted by John Veach on May 02, 1999 at 10:47:39:
        In Reply to: Bounder Turbo Diesel or Discovery posted by Jerry Kreger on April 18, 1999
         Maybe you can hold out for a few more months. Winnebago is supposed to
         come out with a pusher in the Discovery price range for the 2000 model year. I
         have heard that what they are really going to do is just reintroduce the Vectra as
         a pusher. Film at 11. 
 

Posted by Jerry Kreger on May 06, 1999 at 18:56:33:
        In Reply to: Re: Bounder Turbo Diesel or Discovery posted by John Veach on May 02, 1999
         John, When I talked to the Winnebago factory rep, he told me, "that since the
         Vectra Grand Tour was unique to the P12 chassis and that it was totally
         designed around it, another chassis would not or could not be used". I told him
         that I had heard from several dealers that the Vectra was being redesigned
         around the Freightliner w/ a Cummins 275 and Allison 6 speed World
         transmission. I specifically asked him if it would be reintroduced as a diesel and
         he emphatically again said, "no". He said, "this just was not happening", Instead
         he directed me to the new Ultimate Advantage and followed up by sending me
         a factory information packet. This was a few months ago. Maybe they've
         changed their minds. I hope so! Thanks again for your comments, Jerry         
 

Posted by Bob Schaefer on May 12, 1999 at 23:06:41:
        In Reply to: Re: Bounder Turbo Diesel or Discovery posted by Jerry Kreger on May 06, 1999
         I'm the new kid on the block and just starting my research for the big change,
         but I came across a coach a few months ago that really impressed me. It was
         made by Harney Coach Works and the model was the Renegade. It was a 37'
         Diesel pusher. Does anyone have any comments on that one?  
 

Posted by ML Ballew on April 14, 1999 at 12:03:44:
         We are debating the advantages over disadvantages of twin beds in a 40'
         motorhome. We understand there is a 10" step up in the middle of the bedroom
         with the twin bed floorplan. Does anyone have twin beds and is this a big
         problem? 
 

Posted by Tom on April 22, 1999 at 20:22:19:
        In Reply to: twin beds versus queen posted by ML Ballew on April 14, 1999
         We have twin beds in our 94 Southwind. We like the extra storage vs the
         queen in our previous coach. I like not hitting my head like I did squeezing
         around the queen bed. (Since this is a Chevy,I can't address the step-up aspect
         of a pusher with twins). We are not to the full timing stage yet; we may rethink
         this when we upgrade to a pusher in the hopefully near future. BUT, for now
         the twins have been very handy. I've taken my Mom (90 this year) on a few
         trips to see great grandchildren, etc.. My wife or I sometime take mini-trips
         with one of our teenagers, etc. Tom 
 

Posted by Ed Richmond on April 22, 1999 at 21:27:41:
        In Reply to: Re: twin beds versus queen posted by Tom on April 22, 1999
         Tom, I am just starting full-timing, and I have a 33' Sea Breeze. It is gas, Ford
         V10, not diesel, but it has the step up in front of the night stand between the
         beds. The space is used for a pass-through outside storage compartment. Like
         you though I like the storage inside the bedroom with twin beds. The overhead
         cabinets go all the way along three sides of the room. There is a space taken up
         by a pass-through compartment under the floor, but it is not annoying at all. The
         one thing you might not like if you boondock a lot is that the fresh-water tank is
         smaller with single beds because they put the fresh water tank under one bed.
         

Posted by SUE on April 11, 1999 at 15:39:35:
         We're still several years from retirement but it's never too early to dream. We
         love to fish and have a 16' Bass Tracker that we'd like to pull behind a 5wheel.
         Our state allows 65' and multiple towing but I've noticed that not all states are
         as friendly. Surely we're not the only fishing nuts that want to full time. How do
         you do it? We were thinking of a smaller 5W, especially since we'd be in state parks and
         nature preserve type areas. I know we could pull a boat behind a motorhome
         but then we'd lose the mobility of a vehicle and a motor home may be awkward
         to maneuver on some boat ramps. Thanks for your advise!! Happy traveling
         

        In Reply to: Pulling a 5W and a fishing boat posted by SUE on April 11, 1999
         Sue, we will be fulltiming next year. Just bought a 33ft Fiver. No way I'd even
         try to pull a boat behind this rig. Asking for too much trouble with the weight of
         the trailer. We are avid fishers too. We will be getting a Porta-Boat which will
         ride under the trailer and use a 3.3 gas motor or our electric trolling motor.
         Porta-Boat has a web site:www.Porta-Boat.com Thought about the inflatables.
         Sat in one, don't like it, too clumsy and akward in my opinion. Porta-Boat is
         also available at Camping World. Good Dreams, Ebs  
 

Posted by Dave Jenkins on May 02, 1999 at 13:34:50:
        In Reply to: Re: Pulling a 5W and a fishing boat posted by Ebs on April 12, 1999
        Take a look at an alternative way to haul your boat along. www.boatcarrier.com
        A careful look will reveal a similarity in last names. My brother and his son. In my
        case, the price to have a rack built for a medium duty truck was more than the boat
        cost, so we sold the boat and bought a Porta-Bote. Good decision for us so far.
        

Posted by Katy on March 15, 1999 at 21:04:37:
         We're looking for a fifth wheel and are confused about the weights. We have a
         3/4 ton Dodge with a V-10 engine. it lists the maximum weight as 13,600
         pounds. Do the FW weights include the hitch? Does the hitch count toward the
         13,600? We've tried asking the RV dealers, but all they say is not to worry, it
         will tow it just fine. After a dealer said that about a 39 foot FW with triple
         slides at an RV show, I stopped trusting what they say. Can anyone out there
         help or refer me to a good article, etc. that explains this. Thanks for your help in
         advance. 
 

Posted by Chuck Mercer on March 18, 1999 at 11:37:49:
        In Reply to: Fifth wheel weights posted by Katy on March 15, 1999
         Take a look at the link I posted. There's a nice discussion on 5th wheel
         weights. While you're there, poke around some of the other articles...very
         informative. Finally, take a peek at their Information Resources page and go to
         the Life on Wheels area. You'll find some good discussions there about weights
         and other things.  Here it is:  http://www.rversonline.org/ArtWorry.html Good luck.
         

 Posted by Randolph Davis on March 16, 1999 at 21:03:57:
        In Reply to: Fifth wheel weights posted by Katy on March 15, 1999
         Katy, You are right to be concerned. I checked my Dodge towing and payload
         rating guide and it does indeed list 13,600 as the maximum trailer weight for
         your vehicle. This is the total weight the engineers say the truck is safe to tow.
         That means you should not tow more than a total of 13,600 lbs. The dealers
         are right, it will tow it okay. That is, you will have plenty of power on the
         straight and mild hills. If you are going to do any mountain towing, however,
         that may be a different story. More importantly, the engineers are also saying
         that they cannot assume that your truck can safely stop more than that weight in
         an emergency situation. A lot of serious RVers would say you should only tow
         about 75% of your maximum weight. This means you would only be able to
         tow a fiver that weighs, loaded as you would pull it, 10,200 lbs. So this really
         becomes an issue of safety. However, if we continue to violate this we will
         undoubtedly be fussing one of these days when RVers have to get commercial
         driver'r license and stop at all the weigh stations. 
 

Posted by Tom Herman on March 16, 1999 at 12:39:55:
        In Reply to: Fifth wheel weights posted by Katy on March 15, 1999
         I don't know about Dodge pickups in particular, but I've been investigating
         buying a new Ford Super Duty to pull a 5W and I can tell you how they arrived
         at their 14,600 pound rating. They claim that their rating assumes a standard
         cab w/o options, a 150 pound driver, an automatic transmission and (I believe)
         a full tank of gas (29 gallons). Everything else reduces the 5W tow rating. This
         includes passengers, options, and tow equipment (such as the hitch, electrical
         connections, etc.). I'd guess that Dodge has a similar assumption in their towing
         ratings. Hope this helps. Happy Trails. 
 

 Posted by Otto CO on March 21, 1999 at 18:37:13:
         Would like some input on the Fleetwood Bounder model 34V. After looking at
         many units, we really like this one and would like to hear the pro's and con's of
         this unit or the Bounder line in general. We are in the early planning stages of
         going fulltime. We are hoping to have all the details worked out by October of
         this year. Plans call for selling our townhome and other "worldly" possessions.
         We are getting more and more excited about this as we think and talk about it.
         Thanks for any input you care to give. 
 

Posted by Woody Webster on April 16, 1999 at 15:00:42:
        In Reply to: Fleetwood Bounder posted by Otto CO on March 21, 1999
         Our Bounder gave us 5 years of dependability, power, livability and just plain
         fun. Fleetwood has constructed a wonderful vehicle. A tour of the Paxinos
         factory convinced us of that! We traded it in Jan 16 on a new American
         Tradition just because we wanted to. Ours was a 37x with a sink in the
         bedroom !! and a back door in the bedroom. Only reason we traded was ? I
         don't know! Anyhow, I guess we'll enjoy the 102 body and the diesel pusher
         and the living room slideout. Bounder just reinvented the diesel pusher. If you
         haven't looked at this beauty, try it. We almost bought one instead of the
         Tradition. LazyDays RV in Tampa will bend over backwards to make the sale
         to your liking. They saved us over $8000 compared to other dealers. It was
         worth the drive from Maryland. Best wishes and let's stay in touch - we're
         selling out, too and full-timing Aug 1. 
 

Posted by Barb Hofmeister on April 02, 1999 at 09:25:13:
        In Reply to: Fleetwood Bounder posted by Otto CO on March 21, 1999
         If you read either or both of our books, you will get a good idea of what the 34
         J Bounder is like. We loved it and still remember fondly our years in that
         motorhome. In fact, if they had had the new Ford chassis when we were
         shopping for our third motorhome we would have chosen a Bounder again.
         They were a little overweight before the new chassis. It is a very liveable coach.
         Barb 
 

Posted by Larry Monday on April 21, 1999 at 23:34:32:
        In Reply to: Re: Fleetwood Bounder posted by Barb Hofmeister on April 02, 1999
         Before you buy I would suggest that you check out the RV Consumer Group
         Web site first.They have a dandy RV rating book that you will I am sure find
         particularly iteresting.

Posted by Bob Phelps on April 16, 1999 at 23:04:41:
         Dear Ron and Barb, Read your Movin' On book. LOVED it. We discovered it
         just as we had started contemplating hitting the road full-time. You're going to
         think we're out of our cotton-picking minds, but we're going to start off in a
         pop-up. We love our Coleman popper that we've had for a year. We realize of
         course that we'll get sick and tired of the pop-up sooner or later, but then when
         we buy our fifth wheeler, we'll think we've moved into a covernous mansion.
         That may be a few months after we begin our new life, or it may be a week or
         a year, depending on how it goes. Here are a few advantages I see to starting
         off this way: 1. It's cheap and I still have about three years before I can touch
         my retirement accounts without incurring major penalties. We could buy the big
         truck and fifth wheeler now, but why not start out with what we already have?
         2. We intend to sell our home and just about everything in it. We will rent only
         a very small storage place to keep what we can put in a fifth wheeler and that's
         all. So living in the popup will force us to scale down to the bare bones. 3. We
         just bought a Jeep Cherokee with 3-year 36,000 mile bumper to bumper
         warrenty that we can rely on for some time. All that said and done, do we
         sound totally insane? Anybody ever try surviving for any length of time in a
         pop-up? Bob and Linda Phelps 
 

Posted by Charlie Henry on April 05, 1999 at 21:08:40:
         In less than 23 months we will start full-timing and one of the motorhomes we
         are looking at is the Pace Arrow Vision (V10) by fleetwood. We would
         appreciate any input on how this unit performs. Thanks, Charle Henry
         homepark@worldnet.att.net

Posted by Bob Griffin on March 09, 1999 at 11:59:48:
         I too am curious what everyone's experience has been regarding campground
         length restrictions? Ron and Barb started out with a "small" 24, then went to a
         34 then a 39. In their book there is a reference to length being more of a
         problem now, but nothing specific. We are "debating" between a 36' and a 38'
         because of the difference with inside storage. Seems as though the problem is
         more in the state and national campgrounds. I thought the limit was 35 in most,
         not 36 as someone posted? Does anyone have web pages that lists the length
         restrictions for national parks? I have looked at the national park pages and its
         not obvious. I found one reference to the 35' length limit, but didnt mark the
         page and have not been able to find it again. Thanks in advance... Bob...
         rgriffin@cadence.com
 

Posted by Larry Ferris on February 11, 1999 at 22:39:30:
         We are planning to full time it in about two years. What is a good size or max
         lenght for a RV class A. We have heard that most parks and campgrounds the
         maz RV is 36 FT. How true is this? lgfvector@yahoo.com
 

Posted by Linda on February 18, 1999 at 04:39:22:
        In Reply to: RV lenght for full time posted by Larry Ferris on February 11, 1999
         Dear Larry, It is true that a lot of the older State/National Parks can not
         accomodate RVs over 36 feet. My husband and I have been full-timers since
         1988, and are more than comfortable in our 30-foot fifth-wheel. The newer
         models, with slide-outs are even more spacious, and give you TONS of room
         without having to go for length. Remember, if you are going to live in an RV, it
         should have plenty of storage space, easy access to the systems and all the little
         'goodies' that will make you happy. Good luck, and feel free to E mail me if you
         have any questions! Linda HandieWmn@aol.com

Posted by Sharon on February 21, 1999 at 23:56:19:
         I found your site today! I'm so excited I don't want to go to bed and it's getting
         late! My husband and I are really impressed with the Alfa Gold 5th Wheel as
         our full-time rig, specifically Model 252 GF34RLT. We like the storage, the air
         conditioner being in the basement, the heat pump, and the computer/sewing
         desk. We'd love to correspond with other Gold owners. We're concerned
         about the length and weight. We have a 27' Prowler 5th wheel with super slide
         which is our camping rig. It's been great for camping and tows beautifully with
         our Dodge 3/4 ton diesel. We plan to full time starting in 2000! At this time
         we're planning to spend the first 4 months of 2000 traveling and then come
         back to sell our house, etc. We're wondering if we should just do it in our
         smaller 5th Wheel but are concerned about it being sturdy enough for all those
         miles. We plan to visit my son in Florida. Jsplam@aol.com
 

Posted by Randy Davis on February 22, 1999 at 19:35:43:
        In Reply to: Alfa Gold posted by Sharon on February 21, 1999
         Sharon, I would probably keep what you have now. I think you will find that
         the weight of the Alfa Gold is greater than what your truck is rated to tow with
         the gcwr. The larger fivers are nice, but most of them will require a truck larger
         than a pickup truck. ranbec@midwest.net
 

Posted by Barb Hofmeister on February 23, 1999 at 00:09:10:
        In Reply to: Re: Alfa Gold posted by Randy Davis on February 22, 1999
          We agree. I know that the nice new and big 5th wheels are tempting, but for
          that one you would need one of those big trucks. Barb movinon@movinon.net
 

Posted by Toni Warriner on February 23, 1999 at 17:08:05:
        In Reply to: Re: Alfa Gold posted by Barb Hofmeister on February 23, 1999
         Hi, We are Alpha gold owners and we absolutely love it. It is a 33ft with
         double slide-outs. Your are right about one thing. It takes a larger truck. We
         have a 1 ton dually. It does the trick, but we plan to put some dual exhaust
         pipes on it to boost gas milage and power. The rig you have sounds nice and if
         I were you I'd keep it. Good luck and happy travels. Toni gnugget@worldnet.att.net

Posted by jo on March 15, 1999 at 00:11:24:
         My husband and I are planning on becoming fulltimers in June of 2005. We
         have been looking at all makes of motorhomes and it appears that we like the
         Winnebago Chieftan 35U model best. We currently own an Aljo 5th wheel,
         30'. Anyone have any experience with the Winnebago Chieftan? joella@inreach.com
 

Posted by John Veach on March 19, 1999 at 15:07:24:
        In Reply to: winnebago chieftan posted by jo on March 15, 1999
         Jo, we have a 98 Winnebago Chieftain 35wh. No slides on a Chevy chassis.
         We really like this MH. We have had 7 RVs of one kind or another, TT, Class
         C Class A, and this one is the best of breed. When we go fulltime in 32 months
         and 12 days, we are going to trade for a diesel pusher to get more cargo
         capacity, but until then the Chieftain is our baby. The workmanship is
         outstanding, the service we have received is wonderful. A few flaws, but no
         more than any other rig we have ever owned. I would recommend Winnebago
         to anyone. John and Libby Veach Blairsville, GA jrv@stc.net